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Saturday, August 20, 2016

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Google Allo's voice messaging interface looks awesome, with an eery resemblance to WhatsApp's

Posted: 20 Aug 2016 10:50 AM PDT

google-allo-voice-message

Google Allo is clearly one of the most audacious apps to be released by the company in recent times. Not only is it a departure from what Google has long been invested in doing with Hangouts, but it's also trying to catch up in one swift release with competing messaging apps that have been around the block for many years and have had time to perfect their approach.

So it seems logical that the Allo team got some "inspiration" from other messaging services.

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Google Allo's voice messaging interface looks awesome, with an eery resemblance to WhatsApp's was written by the awesome team at Android Police.


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PSA: You can control YouTube playback with OK Google voice commands

Posted: 20 Aug 2016 05:40 AM PDT

voice-commands-youtube

Google Now has a tendency to add voice commands without most people noticing. Besides the few listed in-app, Google hides most of its commands, perhaps the most useful ones. For example, Google's voice actions have been integrated and implemented within YouTube, so you can control video playback with your mi... wait, no that's the next update.

To get started, just start playing any video in the YouTube app. Then you can use any of these voice commands, triggered by the "OK Google" keyword, provided you have enabled its detection from any screen:

  • "Pause" - Pauses the video.
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PSA: You can control YouTube playback with OK Google voice commands was written by the awesome team at Android Police.


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T-Mobile One may violate net neutrality, according to EFF

Posted: 19 Aug 2016 04:14 PM PDT

T-Mobile is no stranger to claims of violating net neutrality. Binge On was attacked for violating net neutrality, though people calmed down when T-Mobile made it easier to toggle and explain how it works. Now it has another problem on its hands.

T-Mobile One offers unlimited video streaming at 480p, but getting HD video will cost you an extra $25 a month per line. Many are saying this violates net neutrality, and even the Electronic Frontier Foundation has spoken up. EFF senior staff technologist Jeremy Gillula says, "It seems like T-Mobile's new plan to charge its customers extra to not throttle video runs afoul of the principle of net neutrality."

This may also violate the FCC's Open Internet Order, which states "ISPs can't throttle traffic based on its type, or charge customers more in order to avoid discriminatory throttling." 

While the plan itself is potentially good (let's face it, a lot of people would love to save money and give up HD video on the go), it's a tough situation when it comes to net neutrality. Just because it's good for the customer doesn't mean it's good for net neutrality, and that's why the FCC is conducting an "informal policy review" on T-Mobile One.

What's your opinion on this issue? Is T-Mobile fighting for the customers, or violating net neutrality? Let us know in the comments!


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